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20100101
20100131
STATION
CSPAN 11
CSPAN2 4
WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
CNN 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 21
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
of canada about the cabinet picks for hamid karzai. what is the concern over the choices that president karzai is making? guest: he has now made two set of choices. he nominated one slate of cabinet officials, about 24 of them. 17 were rejected by the parliament. but arlin is in a healthy move, asserting itself. this is a good thing -- the parliament is, in a healthy move, asserting itself. this is a good thing, checks and balances. he looked at the first slate of nominees by president karzai and parliament did not like them. they did confirm the most important cabinet choices from president karzai, the minister of defense and the minister of interior, which handles all of the police. the minister of finance, the minister of agriculture, when the biggest recipients of assistance. -- one of the biggest recipient of assistance. those picks are clear. president karzai has recently over the weekend submitted a second state to replace those that were rejected the first time. these are lesser-known people. the second slate are lesser- known people. many people have not heard -- many afghans h
. president karzai told a conference that his company -- country was moving slowly toward national security. of the next 45 minutes, british and afghan leaders and the un secretary general outline their goals. general mcchrystal has the international forces serving with such distinction in afghanistan and soon to be over 100,000 strong. foreign ministers, distinguished guests representing over 70 nations and international organizations, including every single member of the 43 nation strong international security assistance force. representing also afghanistan's key regional and muslim partners with whom we are pleased to work and his involvement in this worldwide coalition to support peace and stability in this crucial region are especially welcome to. this is a decisive time for the international cooperation that is helping the afghan people secure and govern their own country. for this conference marked the beginning of the transition process, of bring the necessary conditions under which we can begin district by district, a provident -- province by province, the transferring of responsib
karzai government who stole the election and ruled only topple. so much of afghanistan is effectively run by the taliban. in addition, we've had eight years with the u.s. has isolated between the kinetic counterterrorism strategy and a counterinsurgency strategy that tries to protect people. and we have seen the last oscillation of that. this happened during the bush administration, and now it's happening again in the obama administration that we are moving back to a counterinsurgency strategy. now besides afghanistan being a much harder, not to crack that iraq we now have a lot of domestic factors affecting the u.s. policy. the american public is war weary after two wars stretched out over many years. and i think it's politically perilous for any politician in a democracy to escalate a war that is already unpopular, even lbj didn't do that when he escalated the vietnam war. u.s. spending in afghanistan is more per year than any other military spends on the planet. so we're dumping a lot of resources into afghanistan. the afghan war is expected to cost another trillion dollars over the ne
government as well. guest: years ago when he met with hamid karzai at a dinner, someone said to him, mr. president, how are you going to address this problem of corruption? in fact, he said, what problem? joe biden, famously -- dinner was over -- he threw his napkin down and said, this dinner is over, and walked out. nothing has happened to defrost his relations with president karzai. both biden and richard holbrooke have terrible relations with karzai. host: james traub is with us to talk about the influence of joe biden. republicans, 202-737-0001. democrats, 202-737-0002. independents, 202-628-0205. you can send us an e-mail or tweet us at. next phone call. caller: i think our president is doing very well. if we wanted joe biden as president, he would be president. i like the idea that our president is intelligent. he is not a puppet, like the last eight years. i think he is doing what he is supposed to be doing. host: james traub? guest: i guess i would agree, in general. he believes he could be a good president. i believe this is almost a desirable alternative. he is a very knowledg
't have to continue. khzaei -- karzai was a great hope. everyone no knows him respected him. he might change his mind. the pressures that led him to permit and maybe support this corrupt structure could be reversed over time. the people up and down that structure might change their mind. the parliament is -- has stood up against his nominations. who's knows who's going to happen up and down that road. if we succeed in something that we can do, peter has pointed out the crucial important to the kandahar road. than doesn't be impossible to secure that. that changes the economic nature of southern afghanistan. it could get better. >> if i could just add one point. there's no question that the ghost of vietnam haunts this administration. i can tell you from being in it for 60 days. the ghost of what happened to lyndon johnson walks the corridors of this white house, it walks the corridors of this building every day. it's a mistake. we got to get over it. we got to stop fighting the vietnam war. i don't know whether we could have won or not, but it is not relevant to afghanistan. as marc p
. >> president karzai also mentioned this. are the taliban receptive? >> no, but there are people that might be receptive. they might be looking how the government is looking to share power. that might be a place where they could start. >> you mentioned the role of providing jobs for people. are there jobs for people? is it as simple as saying if you join me i will give you a job? >> i do not think anything like that. jobs at the village level -- that is what people are talking about. if they offered jobs to people, and at the same time, offered negotiations, -- we are not going to ask the taliban to surrender. we're asking them to reconcile, share the power, and resources, then work together. that might help them to bring some leaders. [unintelligible] in the short term, working mainly with the tribal leaders and the leaders of the taliban. >> if we can look into the future, do you agree with general mcchrystal that a political solution to all comnflicts is inevitable? >> i think we are. we need much more time, much more resources. in some ways, eroding the support -- they will be pushed to
stated to be beginning about 18 months after to give karzai and his regime enough time to stand up and fight for itself. we will see. host: we have our numbers on the screen and we will get to the calls in immelman. -- in a moment. you laid out a number of issues which have to be practical issues that have to be dealt with, but the fact of the matter is that you bring vietnam and it becomes a political issue as well. tell us how you view this as a political issue. guest: the lesson that we need to learn, i think, from john kennedy's experience is this. he was with -- he was withdrawing at the time. we have the classified documents. but he did not tell the truth to the american people why? for political reasons. he wanted to get it reelected in 1964. he had begun to order the withdrawal in 1963. host: and these would have been the trainer said you talked about. guest: 16,000 of visors, not combat troops. but my point is that obama should not repeat that experience. he is clearly going to do the best that we can in a given amount of time, but what we face the prospect -- if we face t
. lot of our senior team in the country. spend 90 minutes with president karzai and most importantly we got out to a agaabad valley and met with the team on the ground there. i told the president in february and i kept my word to him, that if he would give our soldiers the resources they needed to get the job done and come home safe he'd have our support. i expressed the night of the president's west point address concern about the timetable of withdrawal. july of 2011 beginning withdrawal. i don't think it makes sense on a battlefield to tell the enemy when you're going to stop fighting. [applause]. so - i'm - i was pleaseed the president called for reinforcements but i wanted to ask tough questions. what i can report to you as general mcchrystal actually answers to people like me but i answer to people like you so i'll report to you, that i'm told that they have the resources and personnel in the decision that the president has made to get the job done. um... - if they have the time to do it. that's issue. i talked to the afghan leaders and rank and file military afghan militants in t
karzai and with his cabinet on numerous occasions, notably with the trip that hillary clinton and i had made to afghanistan on october 18 and 19 in conjunction with the inauguration. the afghans understood this, they are very comfortable with it. so i need to underscore that's what july 2011 means. not a withdraw, but the start of a responsibility transition in which american combat troops will begin to draw down. on the second question and in regard to pakistan, i'm not sure quite how you phrase it. strobe, you made a generic comment? >> mike hamlin and his colleagues have put together a set of bench marks on sort of how things are going. and the trend that they feel they have identified in pakistan is ominous, negative by comparison with a year ago. >> yeah. i read mike's monthly, it's quarterly, actually, isn't it? i read mike's quarterly table with great interest. and it@@@@@@p it's a common problem i've seen in every war i've been involved in. let's not confuse the number of cell phones with low the war is going. let's not minimize that cell phone penetration is a hugely important
gear as losing its cachet and they point to the fact that president karzai began wearing this hat as an attempt to devise the war broke the was afghan rather than fm or regional but there is a quote in here from an afghani saying now it is clear mr. karzai is a passion. do you have confidence in the government, do you have concerns? >> guest: i have confidence and concerns just as i did in iraq. we have to understand the huge challenges the leaders in both of these countries face literally just in staying alive. i got to know hamid karzai when i first got to afghanistan at the beginning of 2002 when he had only been in office a few weeks himself. eight years later he's still in office facing extraordinarily challenges. and there are clearly a lot of problems and things he has to work on and things we have to do in support of him but i had the opportunity to get to know him personally and whatever hat he may be wearing at the moment one thing i absolutely persuaded is he is an afghan national list. >> host: next on call river hit new york on the republican line. >> caller: ambassad
accusations against president karzai's relatives, brothers, part of this drug trade. >> we are talking about two different subject matters here. certainly the minister in afghanistan is very weak. he has no ability to enforce the law. it is nothing. it is sort of a moral role. i guess that is what tom meant when he says it is ineffective. certainly he's very clear. i never had one single word against him in terms of him being involved. then there is a different element, which i brought up, the question of corruption. corruption in kabul. corruption in the provinces. corruption in the army. that's a different issue and i would consider it one of most dangerous ones and one of the most urgent to be dealt with. >> gretchen, last word to you. as this re-assessment of afghan policy goes on, as this crisis in governance in afghanistan is playing itself out, how is this going to help or hinder, more like likely, the effort to control the drugs? >> well, i think at the same time that the drug problem creates challenges. it also presents opportunities. my research among the people of afghanistan and
working together so well recently. >> rose: do you have great confidence in the karzai government that they will be a partner this snefrt i think we cannot look only toll the national government of afghanistan. this is a young government. they've got deep systemic flaws they are burdened with corruption but it is a struggling democracy. but we need to lo beyond that at a village level. this is all about politics and as the late tip o'neill said, all politics is local. it's certainly case in counterterrorism, counterinsurgency. and i thin that's the way we must approach it. it's not just capital to capital nation to nation. this is a fight about the people and for the people. >> rose: turn your attention to al qaeda and how they see the world. and where do they get their momentum and where do they get their strength and where do they get their opportunity. >> there are many theories and my guess-- and that's all it is sds that it may well be about globalization and the growth of free market societies, the growth of liberal institutions around the world. and if you look at in in tho
was -- >> the karzai government -- >> i think again this is one that is also better directed to the state department i think it is probably a sign of some progress house odd as that may sound that there is a healthy give-and-take between the branches of government and in a space afghanistan where the parliament, the legislature is saying we are not going to necessarily rubber-stamp the president's cabinet choices. we have checks and balances here, the congress has to confirm every cabinet selection here and a similar thing is going on there. with that said we have a process as quickly as possible because the government in afghanistan is something that needs to improve quickly and the longer there is limbo the more difficult that becomes. yes, go ahead. >> [inaudible] -- about to happen in yemen and the u.s. but already some of the top leaders pushed back of the exact level of taking from the u.s. and and and -- does that told the u.s. caused with operations to help identify [inaudible] >> i haven't seen the comments which you refer. i've seen other comments from the many military or civilian leaders t
for reforming washington. >> is there a way that can be accomplished? >> president karzai is heading to london this week and he wants some taliban taken off the u.s. sanctions welist in exchange for their laying down their arms. >> you have heard that general petraeus discussed similar type efforts in afghanistan, political reconciliations. you have per general mcchrystal discussed the same thing. obviously, that is a similar path to what happened in iraq. each of those two individuals have talked through this. this is provided that whoever this is accept the event constitution, renounces violence, and publicly breaks through the groups that advocate violence. that is what people expect under the notion of reconciliation. >> last week, the win put out a report saying that the amount of graft and kickbacks in of denniston is about $2.3 billion per year which is 25% of their gross domestic product. who in the administration is really writing point on dealing with issues of corruption in afghanistan? >> a group of people working and our afghan policy -- let me figure out where some of that inform
minutes with president karzai, and most importantly, got out towards kandahar and heli'd to the valley. let me tell you, i kept my word that if he would give soldiers the resources they need to come home safe, he would have our support. and i expressed, the night of the west point addressed. -- the night of the west point addressed, i addressed the need for withdrawal. it never makes sense on a battlefield to tell the enemy when you will stop fighting. [applause] i was pleased that the president responded to a call for reinforcements. but what i can report to you is that general mcchrystal answers to people like me, and i answer to people like you. i will report to you. they have the resources and personnel to get the job done. if they have time to do it. that is the issue. i've talked to leadership, to rank and file military. they said look, the taliban has been using july, 2011, for recruitment purposes. look, i do not mind -- michael back there, soldiers always have deadlines. but you did not publish it. that is the point. would i like soldiers to move out of afghanistan by july 201
. but early signs are encouraging. we are encouraged by the steps president karzai has taken to approve the effectiveness and credibility of his government, and we're committed to working in partnerships to reduce corruption which along with the insurgency is perhaps the greatest threat to afghanistan. and recent polls of public afghan opinion are also encouraging. afghans in significant numbers blame the taliban far more than coalition forces for violence that exists in the country. most afghans believe the taliban is growing weaker, and by huge margins, about 9-1, clearly prefer the afghan government that they have to any alternative the taliban might offer. but our progress on the ground and the attitudes of the afghan people show we're making progress in achieving our objectives and accomplishing our mission in afghanistan as articulated by the president. the third part of our strategy is a stronger partnership with pakistan. the people of pakistan have suffered greatly at the hands of terrorism. pakistanis, civilians, military, police, civilians have sacrificed their lives fighting
these countries face huge challenges. literally just in staying alive. i got to know karzai what a first arrived in afghanistan in 2002 when he had only been in office for a few weeks. eight years later he is still in office facing extraordinarily y challenges. there clearly are a lot of problems. i got to know him personally. but never had he might be wearing at the moment, one thing i am persuaded of is that he is an afghan nationalists. host: next phone call riverhead, new york. caller: ambassador, good morning. i had the recent experience that the third person i talked to came from iraq mentioned it to me that the came from mesopotamia and blamed england for forming a country. they did not bear animosity towards us for coming over there, but felt the only way their country could survived between the different factions was to have a dictatorship. i was wondering if you had experience with any of those ideas? guest: there are as many ideas in iraq about the direction of governance as you might find it in this country. borders throughout the region are artificial in many cases. those borders
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)